The New York Times Reports FBI Search for Jimmy Hoffa Leads to Jersey City

The F.B.I is pursuing a new lead on the case of nationally famous Jimmy Hoffa, the former labor union leader and president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters from the 1950s – 1970s. His death and disappearance in 1975 have been well-documented, reported on, and even brought to the big screen in Martin Scorsese’s The Irishman. As of November 18th, there has been a development on this case for his missing body – and it leads to a landfill in Jersey City.

jimmy hoffa jersey city fbi investigation new york times

On Thursday, the New York Times published a story on the latest developments of the case that has led F.B.I agents to Jersey City. According to the article, a union worker on his deathbed claimed that he was responsible for burying the body underground in a steel drum in a landfill.

Read More: Movie Starring Anne Hathaway + Anthony Hopkins Filming in Jersey City 

A Detroit field office (the city where Hoffa was pronounced dead and has led the investigation over the years) told the New York Times that “F.B.I. agents armed with a search warrant arrived in Jersey City at a plot of dirt and gravel the size of a Little League diamond below the Pulaski Skyway on Oct. 25 and 26 to conduct a ‘site survey.'”

The article explains that the steel drum is said to be buried about 15 feet below ground. Additionally, the F.B.I. teams from the Newark and Detroit field offices are currently analyzing surveys submitted by personnel on-site, according to a spokesperson – whose statement didn’t identify Hoffa by name or layout a timeline for any excavation that may occur.

If you’re in need of a catch up on this story and want to watch the movie starring Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, and Joe Pesci — carve out about 3.5 hours. The Irishman runs 209 minutes and shares the detailed tale of the disappearance.

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Victoria is HG's Associate Editor and Social Media Coordinator for the Hoboken Historical Museum + Fire Department Museum. She is a fourth-generation Hoboken native, BNR in the Mile Square, and Jersey City. Through playing softball in town for fourteen years, playing the trumpet for the Hoboken High School Redwings Band, and graduating from New Jersey City University, these two cities have a special place in her heart. When she isn’t Style Assisting or volunteering at Symposia Bookstore, she’s exploring everything the Concrete Jungle has to offer. You can catch her at art exhibitions, local festivities, traveling, diving into a new book, thrifting, or indulging in some form of arts and crafts.


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