• How to {DIY!} a Faux Marble Tray

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    If you’re feeling fancy, it’s likely that all things marble are catching your eye. The look of marbled pieces can really elevate the look of your home {simply adding a marble utensil holder to your kitchen or even a toothbrush holder to your bathroom can really increase the glam factor}.

    One item in particular that totally brings your style to a new level is a marble tray — something you can leave out and style with books, candles, picture frames — you name it! But solid marble can be price, so here is how you can make one for cheap — and all you need is an ugly tray. Here is said {ugly} tray:

    Before

     

    Here’s what you’ll need for the DIY:

    First, wipe down the tray to remove any existing dirt or dust {this way, the paint and adhesive would stick better}. My particular tray also had metal brackets on the outside corners, so I popped them off using a screwdriver.

    Remove Brackets

     

    Next, take the tray outside to spray the handles a glossy gold. Since the rest of the tray is going to be covered with contact paper, don’t bother taping off the other parts of the tray; if a little paint gets on the sides, it’s totally ok! Spray each handle with two coats {takes about 5 min} and let the tray dry outside for about 30 min.

    Spray Paint Gold

    Once dry, time to cover the base and sides of the tray with the faux marble contact paper! I chose to use “DC Fix 346-0306 Adhesive Film, Grey Marble” but there are so many options out there, so just choose a “marble” that appeals to you.

    First, measure the inside of the tray and cut a piece of contact paper to fit. Then, peel off the backing and place the adhesive onto the tray, like this:

    Tray Bottom

     

    The good news is this contact paper is totally removable {so if you have trouble lining it up perfectly, you can easily peel it off and refit it again… and again}. Take the time to make it line up perfectly because it will totally be worth it in the end! Once in place, use a soft cloth to smooth out any bumps in the paper so it is evenly pressed onto the tray.

    Smooth it out

     

    Then continue to measure the remaining sides of the tray and cover each one with more of the contact paper. Try your best to line up the marble pattern between pieces so you can barely tell where one piece ends and the next begins.

    IMG_9188

    Use an X-ACTO knife to trim the edges so that everything lines up perfectly — and you can also use it to cut around where the tray’s handles are. HIGHLY recommend an X-ACTO knife over scissors because it’s so easy to use and makes the most precise cuts.

    IMG_9186

    And that’s all there is to it! Once complete, it’s hard to believe that the tray is solid wood. The contact paper looks nearly identical to true marble and the glossy wood handles look like they’re made of brass.

    Measure Sides

    Here’s one last look at the before shot:

    Before

    And here’s the after:

    Final product

     

    Pretty amazing, right?! Since the contact paper is removable, it’s nearly impossible to mess up this project — and since there’s virtually no drying time involved, you can do the whole thing in one afternoon!

    Here’s a shot of the tray styled in my living room:

    IMG_9292

     

    What do you think?! We’d love to see what you guys create so tweet us your pics {@HobokenGirlBlog}! And for more DIY and design inspiration, check out Michelle’s design blog at GirlontheHudson.com.


    Written by:

    Ever since she can remember, Michelle has had a passion for DIY projects, interior design, and styling homes. She writes Hoboken Girl's DIY and Design column, where she shares ideas for fun weekend {pinterest-worthy} projects and decor styling that will totally impress your friends and family. A New Jersey native, Michelle is currently the Communications Director for a global digital and design firm in New York City and lives in Uptown Hoboken with her husband, her son, and her dog, Chewie. You can follow her on Instagram at @GirlontheHudson or through her design blog, GirlontheHudson.com.


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